Hybrid Strategies in Art

Up Close and Personal. Recent observations from National Gallery of Art

While visiting museums I find myself on instinctual drive by mode.  Every visit potentially draws me to different artworks seeking varieties of visual experiences. I had these thoughts and captured some beautiful moments in paint.  The mastery of so many approaches humbles and invigorates me.

While the days of working six inches from the surface of my oil painting may be over for now I have been happy to replace this meditative approach to my digital explorations.  I have been drawn to pattern and repeating forms from the days I began making images.  The source may surprise you but I will save this discussion for a different conversation.

But now contemplating a return to painting (only with total outside air) and I have started drawing once again with graphite and color pencil.  I will find some time when it is not unbearably hot or I will wait until fall or a cooler climate.

At dinner we all enjoyed a stimulating conversation in Old Alexandria with Shaina Rowell, a grad and pre med student about her memory research and maintaining memory.  I was thinking about how memory would serve my return to painting.  Research substantiates that repetition is the path to keeping and maintain previous connections.  With that in mind the depth of the brain’s capacity to store information is extensive however if you don’t use it you may lose it is proven to hold some truth.  We can nurture memories, repeat older tasks, remember the positive or dwell on the negative memories.

Detail from  Life Voyages  by Thomas Cole.  1842

Detail from Life Voyages by Thomas Cole.  1842

My art training was all about the mark, the surface the design and to me most importantly the narrative (which was not as well accepted but I knew I had to be serious  about it to fly).  I feel like I have the opportunity to return to my roots of mark making fused with present thoughts.

Detail from  Gare Saint-Lazare .  Edouard Manet.  1873.  The master of the mark.

Detail from Gare Saint-Lazare.  Edouard Manet.  1873.  The master of the mark.

This selection of images were photographed on Mother’s Day (2015) At the National Gallery in DC.  I was intuitively draw to examine the mark close up revealing the texture, the layers and the drawing with the brush.

I am grateful for the opportunity to share some close up captures of amazing paintings.  With limited time I cruised on auto pilot and let instinct direct my attention.

Detail from an Edgar Degas painting.  I have searched National's collection and the web and can't find this painting.  hmmm

Detail from an Edgar Degas painting.  I have searched National's collection and the web and can't find this painting.  hmmm

Detail from  Odalisque.   Auguste Renoir  1870.     

Detail from Odalisque.  Auguste Renoir  1870.  

 

Slightly cropped  Still Life of Oranges and lemons with Blue Gloves.   1889.  A recent acquisition to the National Gallery collection.

Slightly cropped Still Life of Oranges and lemons with Blue Gloves.  1889.  A recent acquisition to the National Gallery collection.

Detail from  A Young Girl Reading.   Jean-Honore Fragonard.  1776.

Detail from A Young Girl Reading.  Jean-Honore Fragonard.  1776.

Detail from  Still Life:  Apples on Pink Tablecloth.   Henri Matisse.  1922.

Detail from Still Life:  Apples on Pink Tablecloth.  Henri Matisse.  1922.

Still researching title and date. Was draw right into those eyes...

Still researching title and date. Was draw right into those eyes...

Detail from  Daniel in the Lion's Den.   Peter Paul Rubens.  1614 / 1616.

Detail from Daniel in the Lion's Den.  Peter Paul Rubens.  1614 / 1616.

Detail from  Head of a Young Man.   Anthony Van Dyck.  1617 / 1618.

Detail from Head of a Young Man.  Anthony Van Dyck.  1617 / 1618.

Detail from  Woman Holding a Balance.   Vermeer.  1664.

Detail from Woman Holding a Balance.  Vermeer.  1664.

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